Going Extreme in Montréal

Volume 7, Issue 93; 02 Jun 2004; last modified 08 Oct 2010

Two months before Extreme Markup Technologies begins seems a good time for one last exhortation to make your plans and prepare to join us.

Every now and then go away, have a little relaxation, for when you come back to your work your judgment will be surer. Go some distance away because then the work appears smaller and more of it can be taken in at a glance and a lack of harmony and proportion is more readily seen.

Da Vinci

Two months before Extreme Markup Technologies begins seems a good time for one last exhortation to make your plans and prepare to join us.

I can now say definitively that I’ll be there. Both of my proposals (for an XPath 2.0/XSLT 2.0 Tutorial and my Extreme DocBook paper) were accepted and, just as important, I’ve bought my airline tickets and booked my accommodations. The latter requires expense requests and approvals and such, so it’s important to get that taken care of with plenty of time to spare.

I proposed my tutorial for half a day, but Debbie and Tommie convinced me that the Extreme crowd would want more detail and more time to ask questions so it’s been turned into a whole day affair. That should be…interesting.

Debbie also added panache to the abstract for my paper in the (not yet published) conference schedule:

Extreme DocBook

The DocBook DTD has been used and maintained for more than a decade, but it is suffering from scope change, scale creep, content model rust, and parameter entity overload. It was time to redesign the DTD as a schema to enforce significant constraints, clean up content models, and allow for straightforward subsetting and extension. A RELAX NG grammar was chosen as an efficient way to convert the models, add new constraints, and generate DTD and W3C XML Schema versions. Come hear about the successes, the failures, and why I believe that RELAX NG provides features and benefits for direct human authorship of schemas, particularly those with many mixed content models.

I wish I’d thought of “content model rust.” That’s perfect.

The next conference I point you at will almost certainly be XML 2004 (which is to say, I will definitely point you at it; because it’s that good too, with a slightly different texture; and that’ll almost certainly be the next thing I’ll point you at.)

In the meantime, come hang out in Montréal and talk markup with a bunch of geeks. Go on, you know you want to.