XPath 2.0 and XSLT 2.0 Tutorial

Volume 7, Issue 138; 03 Aug 2004; last modified 08 Oct 2010

A pointer to the slides from my full-day Extreme tutorial.

I haven’t seen the reviews yet, but I think my tutorial went well. If you want the slides (including the changes I made on the fly :-), they’re online now.

Comments

I've noticed that some code snippets overcome the slide's bounds. Is it due to the process of writing slides in DocBook, then trasforming them into PDF, but not being able to control what happens on screen until you actually see it?

Is there a way to prevent such things to happen? I'd be intersted in hearing your thoughts/workarounds on/for this issue.

—Posted by Giulio Piancastelli on 04 Aug 2004 @ 09:02 UTC #

The honest answer is carelessness on my part. A couple of weeks ago, when I needed to provide a PDF for printed handouts, I scaled the fonts and changed the line breaks to make sure everything fit on the pages.

Since then, I've done more work on the slides but not looked at the PDF. I actually present from HTML that I generate with a slightly different stylesheet.

A better way to handle this is to add a parameter to the PDF stylesheet that identifies the maximum width of a verbatim environment and then automatically scale the text appropriately, I just haven't done that (yet).

—Posted by Norman Walsh on 04 Aug 2004 @ 12:51 UTC #

A better way to handle this is to add a parameter to the PDF stylesheet that identifies the maximum width of a verbatim environment and then automatically scale the text appropriately, I just haven't done that (yet).

Of course to go with this, you need a mechanism to automatically move the audience forward as the fonts get smaller. (Those at the back are probably just reading their email on wifi so moving them forward is probably a good idea anyway...)

—Posted by David Carlisle on 05 Aug 2004 @ 11:06 UTC #

"Of course to go with this, you need a mechanism to automatically move the audience forward as the fonts get smaller. "

I never present the PDF version, so it's only important that the fonts don't get too small to read on the printouts.

"(Those at the back are probably just reading their email on wifi so moving them forward is probably a good idea anyway...)"

Oh, let's just let them choose which is more interesting.

—Posted by Norman Walsh on 05 Aug 2004 @ 06:25 UTC #